An Evening With Drew Philp

An Evening With Drew Philp

Event Details

Wednesday, April 11th – 2018
Traverse City Opera House
7PM // Doors at 6PM
Live Music, Cash Bar, and Morsels Sweet Treats
Stage conversation and Q&A with author
Post-event book signing


$15.50 Reserved

$25.50 Premium Reserved

Ticket Fees Explained

The City Opera House charges fees on each ticket,  which vary by the method in which they are purchased. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Buying tickets in person at the Box Office

The Box Office is open Monday through Friday, 10 am to 5 pm, and one hour before the event. This option charges the lowest fees at $2.50 per ticket—this is a facility fee which funds maintenance of the Opera House, along with general upkeep and improvements. No matter how you buy a ticket, you’ll always pay the $2.50 facility fee.

Buying tickets by phone

Each ticket is charged a $2.50 facility fee plus a $5 fee for the complete order (regardless of the number of tickets or number of performances purchased). This is an economical and convenient way to buy tickets. The friendly Opera House staff mans the phone lines Monday through Friday, 10 am to 5 pm. Call 231-941-8082, ext. 201.

Internet Service Fees

The City Opera House Box Office wants your ability to purchase tickets to be simple, easy and convenient. The Internet Service Fee covers costs that allow the City Opera House Box Office to provide the latest Internet ticketing technology, that allows you to select your own seat, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week from the comfort of your home or office. The Internet Service Fees are based on the face value of the ticket as follows and are on top of the $2.50 per ticket facility fee.

Ticket Price Internet Service Fee
$00.00-$19.99 $2.00
$20.00-$29.99 $3.00
$30.00-$39.99 $4.00
$40.00-$49.99 $5.00
$50.00-$59.99 $6.00
$60.00+ $7.00

Group Sales Order Fee

There is a $7.00 per-order-fee for all group sales orders of 20 or more.

At age 23, author and journalist Drew Philp graduated from the University of Michigan and decided he could help fix Detroit by rebuilding an abandoned house in the inner city. His fascinating journey of self-discovery led to his debut book, A $500 House in Detroit—a great read that delves into issues facing cities today.

The House that Drew Built

At age 23 and fresh out of the University of Michigan, Drew Philp set out on idealistic quest to help fix Detroit by rebuilding an abandoned house in the inner city. He buys his new home for $500 at an auction, by far his easiest task, in what will become a fascinating journey of self-discovery and community, speaking directly to issues facing cities today. Drew relies on his earnings from his day job to rebuild his house, does all the work himself and uses mostly “recycled” materials from the wrecked homes and a factory that surround him. Living for months without heat or electricity, he’s cold and tired and broke. The scariest and most depressing part, he has said, was stepping into an established community he didn’t know or understand.

Philp relays the journey in his debut book, A $500 House in Detroit: Rebuilding an Abandoned House and an American City.  Philp’s insights and observations run deep. His account is layered and complex, and reveals the untold story of Detroit’s rebirth—a tale of race and privilege, kindness and belonging, and the unseen forces that drive new urbanism.

Philp is an essayist and journalist whose work has appeared in books and collections in the United States and Europe. A $500 House in Detroit won the 2017 Stuart D. and Vernice M. Gross Award for Literature He is a 2016 11th Hour Food and Justice fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, and a 2017 Kresge Artist Fellow. He is also a writer in the film industry, having written two feature length dramas.

In addition to writing, Drew hitchhiked across the United States; taught writing, literature and theater extensively in prisons and juvenile institutions across Michigan; taught a class about racism at the University of Michigan; and is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the New England Literature Program. He is 31 years old and lives in Detroit with his dog, Gratiot.

Event Underwriters

Anne and Robert Tucker


Ron Jolly, the 21-year host of WTCM NewsTalk 580, is the author of The Northern Michigan Almanac, and co-author of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula Almanac. His news reporting has garnered numerous awards from UPI and the Michigan Radio News Network. He lives in Acme with his wife, Laura, and two dogs.

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1200 W 11th Street, Suite 231
Traverse City, MI 49684
(231) 486-6868

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